Former students

Victoria Arrandale

Victoria completed an MSc in the UBC School of Environmental Health (now part of the School of Population and Public Health) and a PhD with the Centre for Research Expertise in Occupational Disease at the University of Toronto. Her graduate work focused on the relationship between occupational exposures and respiratory and skin diseases. During her time with the Partnership, she worked on the surgical outcomes project investigating the effect of surgical setting and wait times on return to work outcomes. Victoria is currently a Senior Research Associate at the Occupational Cancer Research Centre (OCRC) in Toronto where she is supported by a Career Development Award in Prevention from the Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute (CCSRI). For information on the results of her research: The effect of surgical setting and expedited status on disability duration among injured workers.

Rahul Chhokar

Rahul completed his MSc in the Department of Health Care and Epidemiology at UBC (now the School of Population and Public Health). While with the Partnership, Rahul worked with Victoria Arrandale on the surgical outcomes project investigating the effect of surgical setting and wait times on return to work outcomes among workers in BC. Rahul is currently an Epidemiologist with Health Promotion & Prevention, Fraser Health Authority. For information on the results of his research: The effect of surgical setting and expedited status on disability duration among injured workers.

Jonathan Fan

Jon examined the effect of expedited surgeries on surgical wait-time and work-disability outcomes for injured workers as a student working with the Partnership. After graduation, he rejoined PWHS as a research coordinator. In that role he analyzed data and managed projects ranging from surveillance of the rates and distribution of serious injuries and fatalities in BC to comparative analysis of return to work outcomes in Canadian provinces and Australian states. Jonathan holds a BSc in Kinesiology from Simon Fraser University, a Master of Public Health from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and is a PhD candidate in epidemiology at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto.

Wenqi Gan

Wenqi completed his PhD in the School of Environmental Health at UBC (now part of the School of Population and Public Health) with a focus on air pollution exposures and cardiovascular outcomes. During his time with the Partnership, he worked on the surveillance of occupational respiratory diseases in BC, including asbestosis. Wenqi is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Population Health, and a Researcher of Epidemiology in the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, New York. For information on the results of his research: Asbestosis surveillance.

Tracy Kirkham

Tracy successfully defended her PhD thesis in October 2011 in the UBC School of Population and Public Health. She investigated exposures to work-related cardiovascular hazards, physiological response, and adverse cardiovascular events among BC firefighters. While with the Partnership, Tracy also did work on compensation of mesothelioma. Tracy is currently a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Montréal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) where she is developing a job exposure matrix for occupational carcinogens. For information on the results of her research: Mesothelioma awareness and compensation.

Rakel Kling

Rakel completed her MSc in the School of Environmental Health at UBC (now part of the School of Population and Public Health). Her MSc research evaluated the effect of a hospital intervention on incidents of workplace violence among health care workers. During her time with the Partnership, her research investigated the effect of different shift schedules on risk of injury and how this relationship varied among male and female workers. Rakel is currently a public health and preventive medicine resident at UBC. For information on the results of her research: Sleep problems and injuries.

Cheryl Peters

Cheryl successfully defended her PhD thesis in the UBC School of Population and Public Health in 2015. Her dissertation research focused on occupational exposure to ultra violet radiation (UVR) among BC workers. Approximately one-third of BC workers are employed outdoors and exposed to UVR, which is associated with skin cancer risk. Cheryl’s research includes the measurement of UVR exposure levels and the determinants of these exposure among a sample of outdoor workers, as well as self-reported sun protection behaviours among a male-dominated segment of the labour force. Cheryl is now a post-doctoral fellow at Carleton University. She also holds a MSc in Environmental and Occupational Hygiene from UBC.

Eline Reiff

Eline was a visiting student at UBC while pursuing her MSc in Medicine in the University of Groningen, the Netherlands. Her research with the Partnership examined associations between sociodemographic, work and employer characteristics and different return-to-work trajectories among injured workers with musculoskeletal injury.

Niloufar Saffari

Niloufar completed her MSc in Occupational and Environmental Hygiene in the UBC School of Population and Public Health in August 2016. She linked administrative data from Citizenship and Immigration Canada to injury claim data from WorkSafeBC to find out if immigrant- and Canadian-born workers in BC have different disability outcomes for the same types of injuries. She also holds a Bachelor of Applied Arts in Psychology from Kwantlen Polytechnic University. Niloufar is now a Partnership Research Assistant.

Dan Sarkany

Dan successfully defended his MSc thesis in August 2011 in the UBC School of Population and Public Health. He investigated the impact of mandatory certification among manual tree-fallers on workplace injuries. He is now a Policy Analyst with the Policy and Regulation Division at WorkSafeBC. For more information on the results of his research: Certification and injury risk in tree fallers.

Imelda Wong

Imelda successfully defended her PhD thesis in October 2012 in the UBC School of Population and Public Health. She investigated the association between workplace stress and heart disease among paramedics. She also received widespread media attention for her study on the association of shift work and the risk of worker injury as part of her work with the Partnership. Imelda currently holds the Mustard Post-doctoral Fellowship at the Institute for Work & Health (Toronto). For information on the results of her research: Shift work and injuries.

a place of mind, The University of British Columbia

School of Population and Public Health
2206 East Mall,
Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z3, Canada
Tel: 604-822-2772
Partnership for Work, Health and Safety
2206 East Mall,
Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z3, Canada
Tel: 604-822-8544

Emergency Procedures | Accessibility | Contact UBC  | © Copyright The University of British Columbia